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VSRT and MOSAIC

The Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT) interferometer is an educational system developed with the support of the National Science Foundation. The VSRT uses 0.45 m diamter dishes with 12 GHz satellite TV electronics and other inexpensive consumer parts that can be purchased from retail outlets or over the web. The system can be used in the classroom to demonstrate the basics of interferometry and physical principles related to the propagation and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation. The VSRT can also be used for radio observations of the Sun.

The Mesospheric Ozone System for Atmospheric Investigations in the Classroom (MOSAIC) is an array of single-telescope systems based on VSRT hardware observing the 11 GHz line of ozone in the mesosphere. Several MOSAIC systems will be deployed to conduct original research measuring the diurnal, seasonal, and latitudinal variations in mesospheric ozone concentration. The educational goal of the MOSAIC project is to provide students with an opportunity to analyze and interpret data in a networked collaborative environment.

VSRT and MOSAIC Memos

VSRT and MOSAIC Publications

VSRT Introduction

VSRT Assembly Manual

VSRT Software

Basic VSRT Operation (doc)

Versatile System for Learning about Radio Telescopes (Teaching Unit)

Meet Me in the Mesosphere (Teaching Unit)

MOSAIC User's Guide

Online access to the MOSAIC data

The data from spectrometers observing the 11 GHz ozone line is available here

Currently data is being provided from Chelmsford High School, Haystack Observatory, Bridgewater State College, Union College and University of North Carolina in Greensboro. These spectrometers are pointed to sample the mesospheric ozone at 38N, 71W. The "raw" spectra from these spectrometers, which consist of 90 second averages, are returned each day. The online interface allows rapid access to the data with time resolution of 10 minutes in 4 easy steps. [Advanced options allows accdess to data with higher time and frequency resolution.] Several plots are provided but students are encouraged to perform their own analysis of the data. Suggestions for gaining experience in research and data analysis using the data include statistical analysis and the chemistry of the diurnal and seasonal variations of the mesospheric ozone. (see VSRT memo 062).

This program was funded by The National Science Foundation.

 

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